Road to Independence Revolution Essay

“War is when the government tells you who the bad guy is. Revolution is when you decide for yourself.”(Unknown) In the case of the American Revolution, the colonists decided for themselves and truly believed in the cause. The Colonists knew that “change” had to take place because of the unfair treatment they experienced. The American Revolution was a time where Colonists fought for what they believed in, independence, and when they broke away from England. Boycotts, holding Congresses, and forming patriotic groups were the three most effective actions Colonists took, that led to the American Revolution.

The boycotts were an effective action the Colonists took, leading up to the Revolution. During the boycotts, Colonists refused to buy British and European goods in order to protest against the British acts. Aware of the growing opposition, Parliament repealed all the Townshend Acts, except the one on tea. As a result, Colonists ended their boycotts, and started to trade with British merchants again. Few years later, the Continental Congress decided to boycott all British goods and trade. No British product could be brought into or consumed in the colonies, and no colonial goods could be shipped to Britain.

To protest the Stamp Act, thousands of Americans refused to buy British and European goods. They also signed nonimportation agreements in which they pledged not to buy or use goods imported from Britain. As a result of boycotts, the Parliament canceled the remaining acts. In addition to the boycotts, Colonists also formed Congresses. Debating Proposals at the Continental Congresses led to the American Revolution. The colonial leaders need to unify the colonies against the British policies, led to the formation of congresses. The first congress was the Stamp Act Congress, assembled in October 1765. The Stamp Act placed tax on almost all printed materials in the colonies – everything from newspapers and pamphlets to wills and playing cards. All printed materials had to have a stamp, which was applied by British officials. In October representatives from nine colonies met in New York at the Stamp Act Congress. They sent a petition to the king declaring that only colonial institutes should be allowed to apply taxes. In March 1766, Parliament gave in to the colonists’ demands and repealed the Stamp Act.

In September 1774, 55 men sent as delegates from all colonies except Georgia, to the city of Philadelphia for the First Continental Congress. These men had come to establish a political body to represent American interests and challenge British control. In this Congress, the delegates called to repeal 13 acts stating they violate the colonists’ rights. In addition, they voted to boycott all British goods and trade. One major decision was to endorse the Suffolk Resolves, which called the people of Suffolk Country, Massachusetts to fight against the redcoats. These armed groups were called militias. On May 10 1775, the Second Continental Congress assembled. That was the first Congress in which independence was discussed. It authorized the printing of money, and set up a post office. It also established committees to communicate with Native Americans and with other countries. Most important, the Congress created the Continental Army to fight against Britain in a more organized way than the colonial militias did. The Congress chose George Washington to be the Army’s commander.

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The Second Continental Congress began to govern the colonies. King George III refused to receive the Olive Branch Petition – a formal request; it assured the king of the colonists’ desire for peace. In addition to Congresses, colonists also formed patriotic groups to fight against Britain. Forming patriotic groups was an effective action that led to the American Revolution. Patriots formed two groups to fight against the redcoats, the Committees of Correspondence and the Sons of Liberty. The Son of Liberty was formed to protest the Stamp Act. In 1772, Samuel Adams formed the Committees of Correspondence to form communication between colonies of bad acts by British troops. The Committees of Correspondence spread throughout the colonies, bringing together protesters from all over the colonies.

It also circulated writings about British injustice. Colonial leaders used news of the killing in the Boson Massacre as propaganda – information designed to influence opinion -against British. As time went by, the group grew much larger than the nine people it started out with. The forming of patriotic groups helped to fight against the redcoats. These patriotic groups, like the Liberty, made Britain colonial officials nervous. Forming these patriotic groups was a major step in gaining Independence.

Boycotts, holding Congresses, and forming patriotic groups were the three most effective actions Colonists took leading up to the American Revolution. The Boycotts were an effective action the Colonists took, leading up to the Revolution. Debating Proposals at the Continental Congresses led to the American Revolution. Forming patriotic groups was an effective action that led to the American Revolution. A spirit of Independence became obvious early in the history of the American people. Far from the established rules and limitations they had faced in their home countries, the new settlers began to make their own laws and develop their own ways of doing things.

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