The Great Gatsby Essays

Color Symbolism in Great Gatsby

White: related to Jordon and Daisy, usually represents purity, ironically it represents the false purity and corruption of Daisy and Jordon. White is also related to dreams and fantasy, which ties into Gatsby and Nick because to them the girls were like fairies that seemed to float around. Daisy can be related to a white flower with a golden center because as you see in the novel she appears pure on the outside, but is corrupted by the golden money…

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Hays Views on Gatsby

Hays, Peter L. “Oxymoron in The Great Gatsby.” Papers on Language & Literature 47.3 (2011): 318+. General OneFile. Web. 19 Oct. 2012. There are significant paradoxes throughout F. Scott Fitzgerald’s (life and) work frequently represented by oxymorons, of which Wolfsheim’s eating with “ferocious delicacy” (75) is only one of the most apparent and, as such, very possibly a clue to the paradoxes in the novel. Kirk Curnutt in a review of Fitzgerald’s short stories remarks that the titles Flappers and…

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Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald

Many characters in the Great Gatsby parallel to Fitzgerald life. For example, Daisy, the women Jay Gatsby has been basing his whole life on, is similar to Zelda Sayre, who would not marry Fitzgerald at first because of his lack of success. Gatsby and Fitzgerald both met vital women to their lives at dances, and both while they were stationed at camps in the army. Gatsby met Daisy at Camp Taylor in Illinois, where they danced and fell in love….

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Great Gatsby Coming of Age Novel

The novel the Great Gatsby isn’t your classical coming of age novel at least for the most part. This is because Nick Caraway is the only character who actually ends up changing by the end of the novel. Furthermore coming of age novels refer to a character(s) that pass the rite of passage in order to enter manhood or womanhood. Therefore this novel is about the growth of maturity. The story begins with Nick attending dinner at the Buchannan house….

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Great Gatsby Analytical Writing

Gatsby is a pillar of the American literary canon and has been woven over generations into the very fabric of American culture. You should read this text carefully and interactively – annotating your text so that, during class discussions, you are able to find and reference meaningful passages. On the second day of classes you will turn in a well-crafted, thoughtful essay of 3-6 pages. Your essay must be typed, doubled spaced, in 12 pt. Times New Roman font, with…

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Jay Gatsby the Legend

‘It is not enough to make progress; we must make it in the right direction. ‘ How important is it to apply this saying our lives? Well, is very important. What is that makes us human beings and not animals? Is it where we come from and what we have or self-control of our wants and needs? To what extent are we ready to go to gain power that we no longer remember who we are! Jay Gatsby from F….

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Characters Compared to Celebrities

Tom Buchanan is the husband of Daisy Buchanan in The Great Gatsby novel by F. Scott Fitzgerald. Tom can be described as an extremely wealthy brute of a man. He is very athletic and successful. Tom is also very selfish, and he will do anything to get what he wants. In addition he has absolutely no shame in anything that he does and he thinks very highly of himself. Tom is very judgemental and often forces confrontation. These characteristics can…

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The Green Light in the Great Gatsby

Key Factors * 1920’s America “the Jazz era” – America had a soaring economy – Set in the summer of 1922. * Wealth, class, social status, love, materialism and the decline of the”American Dream” (caused by a dizzy rise in the stock markets after WW1) are all major themes * Narrated through the eyes of character Nick Carraway – educated at Yale, moves to New York from Minnesota – presumably searching for success i.e. the American Dream * The storyline…

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American Dream in the Great Gatsby

In todayʼs society, it seems that everyone strives to be at the top, and for many people, the top means the most success, and success means money. The American dream- to go from nothing to the pinnacle of success- is apparent both in the novel The Great Gatsby and in the modern world. Another apparent aspect of the American Dream is second chances, Gatsby, along with many other Americans today strives for second chances, Jay Gatsby seems to be the…

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Quiz About the Great Gatsby

1. Who is “The Great Gatsby” narrated by? What do you know about his family background, and why does he com e to New York? What business is he in? Nick Carraway, the novel’s narrator, comes from a well-to-do Minnesota family. He travels to New York to learn the band business; there he becomes involved with both Gatsby and the Buchanas. 2. What is the difference between East Egg and West Egg? East Egg: East Egg is the fashionable group…

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The Scarlet Letter and the Great Gatsby

Although set in vastly different cultures at different eras within American history, a common theme can be established when comparing The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald with The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Both novels, for example, examine the dichotomy between reality and appearance as well as the conflict between individual and social values. In The Scarlet Letter, Hester Prynne and Arthur Dimmesdale love each other. This love holds great personal value for them. However, because their relationship is…

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The Great Gatsby – Dichotomy Illusion Vs Reality

This is an age old theme in literature. Illusion / Reality is known as a “dichotomy,” which means two terms that are opposite to each other, but which create an interpretive tension. Literature is filled with dichotomies, and authors use them to create meaning: light / dark; good / evil; war/ peace; male / female; life / death. There are hundreds of them. A very effective way to understand and interpret literature is to locate the different dichotomies, and try…

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The Great Gatsby_ Prohibition

The Great Gatsby is set in 1920’s which is the heart of the gangster era in America. Along with gangsters comes organized crime specifically bootlegging alcohol during prohibition. Prohibition was brought about in 1920 by the Eighteenth Amendment to the Constitution, and it ended in 1933, it was ratified by the Twenty-First Amendment to the Constitution. Bootlegging in the 1920’s is the way many people got rich, including the main character in The Great Gatsby, Jay Gatsby. Prohibition is one…

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Great Gatsby and Elizabeth Barrett Browning

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald written in the Jazz age of 1920s America, and Sonnet from the Portuguese written by Elizabeth Barrett Browning composed in the wake of Romanticism, although the two texts were composed in two distinct time period both texts are influenced by their varying contexts in their portrayal of the enduring human concerns. Both authors explore the universal human concerns of love, hope and mortality through the use of various language features such as metaphors,…

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Great Gatsby and Araby

In “Araby,” an allegorical short story from his compilation, Dubliners, author James Joyce depicts his homeland of Ireland as a paralyzing and morally filthy environment. The young protagonist is an unknowing victim of society’s preoccupation with materialism, and in his rush to grow up accepts its distorted views of wealth and love as truth. Conversely, Jay Gatsby, from F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, tries to win back the heart of Daisy Buchanan through his obsessive attempts to repeat the…

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