Philosophy Essays

Plato’s Theory of Ideas

Plato’s theory of Ideas addresses the problem of change. As we experience the world we experience it as change. As Heraclitus puts it, all things are in flux (Barnes 58). Things change through time, and they also change through space, via motion. One never steps in the same river twice. But against this ancient wisdom of Heraclitus there is also the wisdom of Parmenides, who proclaims that nothing ever changes, because whatever exists necessarily has permanent existence (Ibid 245). Parmenides…

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Position Paper (education) on Philosophy

The word education is defined as the act or process of imparting or acquiring general knowledge, developing the powers of reasoning and judgment, and generally of preparing oneself or others intellectually for mature life, it is also an art of teaching; pedagogics. Education signify the activity, process, or enterprise of educating or being educated and sometimes to signify the discipline or field of study taught in different schools of education that concerns itself with this activity, process and training. Education…

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Student Teaching

1. What kind of questions will you have for your mentor teacher? For student teachers, teaching is a way to get a professional experience under the supervision of a certified licensed teacher. In order to start with this new journey, student teachers must familiarize themselves with their respective mentor teachers. One way of getting to know them is by asking some questions. Queries should focus on the mentor teacher’s teaching methods and styles as well as their ways of properly…

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Metaphysics & Epistemology

G. E. Moore’s main contributions to philosophy were in the areas of metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and philosophical methodology. In epistemology, Moore is remembered as a stalwart defender of commonsense realism. Rejecting skepticism on the one hand, and, on the other, metaphysical theories that would invalidate the commonsense beliefs of “ordinary people” (non-philosophers), Moore articulated three different versions of a commonsense- realist epistemology over the course of his career. According to data I researched Moore’s epistemological interest also motivated much of…

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The Self

This essay will explore the concept of “self-interest” in humans as discussed by both Adam Smith and Immanuel Kant. The concept of “self-interest,” in itself, is very simple and self-explanatory. It is basically the idea of considering one’s own needs before anything or anyone. In animals, as well as in humans, “self-interest” is considered to be an innate behavior, which provides for the means of the self-preservation of one’s life. However, when one considers the capacity to “reason” in humans,…

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John Locke and Immanuel Kant

We are here concerned with the relationship between the human mind, somatic-sensory perceptions, objects of perception, and claims of knowledge arising from their interaction, through the philosophies of John Locke and Immanuel Kant. Confounding the ability to find solid epistemological ground, philosophers have, generally speaking, debated whether ‘what’ we know is prima facie determined by the objective, as-they-are, characteristics of the external world 1(epistemological realism) or if the mind determines, as-it-is, the nature of objects through its own experiential deductions…

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Analysis of Giovanni Pico Della Mirandola’s Oration on the Dignity of Man

In Giovanni Pico della Mirandola’s “Oration on the Dignity of Man,” he discusses his conceptions and ideas on the nature and the potential of human beings. Notably, in his discussion, he reconciles and combines the teachings of Islam, Judaism and Christianity into a single binding thought. He also attempted to reconcile the several contrasting teachings of Aristotle and Plato, although it is noticeable that he is more in favor of the teachings of the latter. Although his oration is great…

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The Limitless Pursuit_ a Reaction to a Passage from Sir Hugh Walpole

“The whole secret of life is to be interested in one thing profoundly and a thousand other things well,” said the novelist Sir Hugh Walpole. The first half of this passage suggests that man, in order to live well, must be able to focus on one specific field of endeavor, while the other end of the conjunction proposes that he must be fascinated with a myriad of secondary interests other than the preoccupation peculiar to him. With these brief points…

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Sartre’s Existentialist Philosophy

From the critical perspective, Jean-Paul Sartre did not believe that there could be any personality or character pattern that at any given time could determine a person’s future actions. This does not mean that there is no such thing as a personality. In fact, there is such a thing and it plays an important role in Sartre’s understanding of self. This personality is one component that can contributes to what Sartre called bad faith. However, before bad faith can be…

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The Republic of Plato Case

According to Thrasymachus, justice is interest of the rulers and the superior. His view of justice considered the whole state with someone being superior. The person superior is the ruler. Being superior, he is the one that would make the law.  The rulers would make laws that would benefit them. If his servants would refuse to obey, then they would be punished and called unjust while those who would obey would be called the just. Socrates started to refute this…

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Pacifist Philosophy in Response to the Idea of War

There are a variety of different philosophical interpretations of the idea of war, even what it means to be at war. Engaging in war is generally described as being the resort to violence in order to attain political ends. War is described by some as being a tyrannical crime, in that power hungry individuals lose sight of their morals and resort to unethical violence committed against others (Walzer, 2006). From this perspective, one notes the assertion that there is never…

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Personal Philosophy

Educational philosophy is sometimes referred to as the immediate objectives of education. Immediate objectives on the other hand are purposes which a subject at a given time must aim to achieve through the courses of study or the curriculum. Its aims constitute a very important aspect of the total education. They are more specific and they can be accomplished in a shorter period of time, maybe a day or a week. These, too, are considered goals of specialization. This study…

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Modern Philosophy

Herman Ebbinghaus has pointed out that psychology and philosophy are intertwined one way or the other. In order for Psychologists to study human behavior, as well as metal process, they must go step back and consider being philosophical. One must be rational and logical when studying this process and behavior, thus going back to psychology’s roots. Towards the end of the Renaissance period, Rene Descartes emerged and was tagged as the father of Modern Philosophy. As mentioned, Philosophy and Psychology…

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The History of Philosophy

Greece is probably one of the richest countries when it comes to philosophical heritage. The biggest people who shaped the thinking of the world today like Plato and Socrates are both products of a country rich in the critical thinking area like Greece. But ofcourse, before Plato and Socrates started taking the world by storm, there had been prominent thinkers the paved the way for the greatest men to find the most important treasures in life; Philosophy. It all started…

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Plato on Justice

Plato’s interpretation of justice as seen in ? The Republic’ is a vastly different one when compared to what we and even the philosophers of his own time are accustomed to. Plato would say justice is the act of carrying out one’s duties as he is fitted with. Moreover, if one’s duties require one to lie or commit something else that is not traditionally viewed along with justice; that too is considered just by Plato’s accounts in ? The Republic….

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