Painting Essays

Analysis of Violin and Candlestick by Georges Braque

Braque’s oil painting is a cubistic still-life. It’s content seems to be made up of what looks like his belongings – a violin, a fruit bowl, a candlestick, a newspaper etc. As he lived in Paris at the time this painting was produced, these belongings would have been in his apartment in one of the most artistic city in the world. I am guessing the process he used to create this piece is by dabbing paint onto the canvas instead…

Read >>

Cezanne’s Fruit and Basket

In my assay I want to compare Huseyin Zekai Pasa‘s, Still-Life with watermelon and Cezanne’s Vessels, Basket and Fruit paintings in the aspect of subject matter and style. As and subject matter we see that both artist chose still-life with fruits on the desk. However Zekai Pasa used richer table with more different kinds of fruits. When we look at the Cezanne’s work we see only apples and pears. But in Zekai pasha’s work we see watermelon, melon, grapes, pears,…

Read >>

Frida Kahlo

The “Henry Ford Hospital” (The Flying Bed) completed in 1932, created by the artist Frida Kahlo was her first painting on tin. The painting contains all components of “Frida Style” ex-voto (retablo); which is small in size, painted on tin, portrays a tragic event and an inscription. The style used for this painting is Surrealism. This work is made by Oil on Metal. The dimensions of the work are 12 ¼” x 15 ½” In a shape of a Rectangle….

Read >>

Picasso`s Le Demoiselles D`avignon

Undoubtedly, Picasso intended his 1907 painting “Le Demoiselles d’ Avignon” to shock audiences and, in particular, art-critics and artists. Evidence that Picasso intended to shock the public with this work is apparent in the painting’s title and subject matter, “a large and strange canvas based on memories of a brothel in the Rue d’Avignon, Barcelona” (Geiser & Picasso, 1955, p. xx) which are associated with brothels and prostitutes. Obviously, both the scale and subject matter of Picasso’s painting are intended…

Read >>

Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa and Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe Paintings

Leonardo DaVinci’s Mona Lisa is one of the most well-known paintings in the world. Show anyone from a 60 year old man to a 10 year old girl a picture of the painting and, most likely, they will be able to name the painting as well as the painter. While some say that DaVinci’s painting is the most famous of all created, many of Andy Warhol’s paintings are also easily recognizable. Almost everyone has seen the Campbell’s Soup Can series…

Read >>

The Death of Socrates by Jacques Louis David

The Death of Socrates by Jacques Louis David is a perfect example of a neoclassical painting. As a characteristic of this time, the author focuses on symmetry and on the characters’ faces to tell the story. Jacques Louis David uses a smooth texture in his composition and primary bright colors predominantly in the disciples’ robes. It is a secular piece of art that represents a historical moment, the death of Socrates, a Greek philosopher, known as one of the wisest…

Read >>

Pablo Picasso and Peter Howson

The artists I examined were both two very portraiture artists The two I am going to examine are: Pablo Picasso who designed the image called “The Weeping Woman” in 1937 and Peter Howson who created “The Boxer” in 1977. Pablso Picasso a spannsih painter who used cubism styles to design his posters designed “The weeping woman” in 1937 which has brought attention to many people over the years and has become extremely famous with his use of bright colours, extraordinary…

Read >>

Sabine Women

David began planning the work while he was imprisoned in the Luxembourg Palace in 1795. France was at war with other European nations after a period of civil conflict culminating in the Reign of Terror and the Thermidorian Reaction, during which David had been imprisoned as a supporter of Robespierre. David hesitated between representing either this subject or that of Homer reciting his verses to the Greeks. He finally chose to make a canvas representing the Sabine women interposing themselves…

Read >>

Frederick Varley

Frederick Horsman Varley was one of the most famous painters out of the Group of Seven. He loved to paint the landscape of the beautiful country we live in. He also enjoyed the portrait style of art. He was one of Canada’s most distinguished portrait painters. Frederick Varley was born on January 2nd, 1881 in Sheffield, England. He studied art in his home town for the first 31 years of his life at the Sheffield School of Art in 1892-1900…

Read >>

Landscape with the Fall of Icarus

Thesis: In Pieter Bruegel’s painting, “Landscape with the Fall of Icarus,” he uses a Greek myth, orientation of objects, and an emphasis on peasants to convey that being too ambitious results in negative outcomes, which causes the viewer to think that living more simply will lead to a more satisfying life. In the bottom right-hand corner of the painting, you can see Icarus upside-down, drowning. In a Greek myth, Icarus is given a pair of wings made of wax and…

Read >>

Caravaggio’s David with the Head of Goliath

Caravaggio’s David with the Head of Goliath is a truly important picture expressing art’s underlying paradigm, every painter paints himself, in a clear and unmistakeable way. It was reported in the mid-seventeenth century that both heads, Goliath’s and David’s, are self-portraits at different stages of life though David is described as “il suo Caravaggino”, or in English “his little Caravaggio.”1 This clearly refers to how Caravaggio painted himself when young because although his real name was Michelangelo Merisi he was…

Read >>

Johannes Vermeer_ Girl with a Pearl Earring

Johannes Vermeer’s, “Girl with a Pearl Earring” was painted in 1665-66. It is oil on canvas painting of an ordinary girl that is turned sideways and appears that she is glancing over her left shoulder. Not too much is known about the girl, but there are speculations that it could be one of three people. Some think it is his daughter Maria; while others are torn between the daughter of Vermeer’s benefactor, Magdalena and a maiden he hired to help…

Read >>

Simon Flores

Simon De La Rosa Flores was descended from a family of artisans originally from Balayan, Batangas. Uncle Pio De La Rosa taught Simon the rudiments of the arts when he was in his teens. Later, he enrolled at the Academia de Dibujo y Pintura, studying under Lorenzo Guerrero and Lorenzo Rocha. Flores first gained attention in 1871 when the colonial administration commended him for the portrait of Amadeo I, which he presented to the province oil Pampanga. During this time…

Read >>

Mark Rothko

Mark Rothko is one of the important figures in the generation of painters. His work still draws attention to many people around the world. Born in Dvinsk, Russia (in what is now Latvia), Marcus Rothkovich was the fourth child of Jacob Rothkovich, a well to do pharmacist and his wife Anna Rothkovich. As Russia was a hostile environment for Zionist Jews, Jacob immigrated to the United States with his two older sons in 1910, finally sending for the rest of…

Read >>

Demoiselles D’avignon and Grand Nu

Pablo Picasso’s Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907) and Georges Braque’s Grand Nu (1908) are both crucial works of modernist painting from the same place and period. Though both artists were pioneers of Cubism, these works use markedly different styles; while Picasso’s work inspired Cubist painting, which used simultaneous views of multiple angles, Braque’s is a classic work of Fauvism, which emphasized vivid colors and bold lines instead of sharp angles. Both works are unconventional representations of nude models, rendering them less erotic…

Read >>