Mary Shelley Essays

Celebration to Individualism in Mary Shelly’s _frankenstein_

What comes to mind when the idea of “Romantic Literature” enters your head? Immediate imageries consisting of two lovers, a rose, or even a starlit sky may come to mind. In Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein, she disproved these imageries by creating her own scenario with grotesque images and lonely characters. Many have overlooked this novel as a romantic literature but it is actually one that contains the most elements of a romantic literature. Romantic literature emerged through a movement called Romanticism….

Read >>

Analyzing _frankenstein_ – Formalist Perspective

The formalist method of literary criticism is primarily focused on the text itself, rather than external topics such as history and background, the author’s biographical information, or the social contexts which surround a piece of work. In the formalist perspective, we ask ourselves, why did the author choose to write his or her work in this specific style? Why did he or she choose to include certain literary elements? “What matters most to the formalist critic is how the work…

Read >>

The Modern Prometheus

Such is the subtitle that accompanies Mary Shelley’s classic, Frankenstein. We’ve all heard of the famous monster created by Dr. Victor Frankenstein. But, not many know why the story is subtitled, “Or, The Modern Prometheus”. In fact, many may not even make the connection to the story of the ancient Greek god who brought fire to humans, his own creation, and was eternally punished for it. However, rhetorical analysis reveals quite a few similarities between the characters, and proves Shelley’s…

Read >>

An Analysis of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley was born in London in 1797 to radical philosopher, William Godwin, and Mary Wollstonecraft, author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman. Wollstonecraft died 11 days after giving birth, and young Mary was educated in the intellectual circles of her father’s contemporaries. In 1814, at the age of seventeen, Mary met and fell in love with poet, Percy Bysshe Shelley. She ran away with him to France and they were married in 1816 after Shelley’s wife…

Read >>

Victor Frankenstein and Robert Walton There Similarities

The desire to make history to discover what remains undiscovered, or to know what remains unknown is an everlasting human goal. Although many have failed to realize this dream, a very few have been passionately successful in its pursuit. The immortality power that these select few have, of course, only provided to encourage those who come after. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s Frankenstein is a literary reflection upon this intensely human desire here illustrated by the title character’s quest for personal glory…

Read >>

Mary Shelly’s ‘frankenstein’, and P.b. Shelly’s ‘alastor’

The theme of suffering is best conveyed through the “solitary” aesthetic figure of the wanderer or vagrant. Romantic writers produced works revealing extremes of isolation and socialisation, creating ‘either a wild beast or a god’ and proving that although solitude can render knowledge, it can also be the cause of deep suffering. Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, is an account of the monstrous potentiality of human creative power when severed from moral and social concerns. Suffering is displayed through the characters of…

Read >>

Destiny and Frankenstein

“Destiny was too potent, and her immutable laws had decreed my utter and terrible destruction.” Victor Frankenstein says this right before telling Walton his story.Destiny played an important role in the book Frankenstein. Victor sees it as the force that caused his downfall. He blames most of what has happened on destiny. At first it was his destiny to build the monster, afterwards he says it is his destiny to destroy it. Victor feltas if some force was making him…

Read >>

The Motive of Nature Vs. Technology in Mary Shelley’s _frankenstein_

In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein nature is purity and innocence in a vile, corrupt world. It is freedom and serenity and holds the power to overwhelm human emotion and make dismay small and insignificant in comparison to the essence of nature. Nature even has tremendous effect on Victor; it becomes his personal physician and personal therapy when he undergoes torment and stress. Technology, however, causes Victor to experience a much more negative effect. By causing sorrow and pain, Shelley communicates with…

Read >>

Influence of _family_ in Mary Shelley’s _frankenstein_

Family in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein demonstrates a myriad of roles, influencing Victor Frankenstein and his creation. Victor’s childhood establishes a connection between the reader and Victor, building his character. The monster is influenced by the various episodes with the family of cottagers The recounting of Victor’s childhood coalesce the reader to Victor, conveying his affection for his family. “No human being could have passed a happier childhood than myself…it was the secrets if heaven and earth that I desired to…

Read >>

Frankenstein_ the Danger of Knowledge

“It was on a dreary night of November, that I beheld the accomplishment of my toils. With an anxiety that almost amounted to agony, I collected the instruments of life around me, that I might infuse a spark of being in to the lifeleless thing that lay at my feet. It was already one in the morning; the rain pattered dismally against the panes, and my candle was nearly burnt out, when, by the glimmer of the half-extinguished light, I…

Read >>

The Effect of Isolation and Rejection

In the novel Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, the monster is born more or less with the mind of a baby. He craves attention, love and nurturing as all babies do. The monster was left with no one to teach him anything, and to understand the world solely on his own. After observing, and slowly figuring out how the world works, he was unable to imitate because no one accepted him, including his creator. Isolation and rejection can affect everyone differently,…

Read >>

Elizabeth, the Monster and Patriarchy

In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, some blatant parallels are made between Dr. Frankenstein’s adopted sister, Elizabeth, and the monster he created. Both of these innocent creatures, together represent all of mankind in their similarities and differences, Elizabeth being the picture of womanhood and goodness, the monster representing manhood and evil. Both Elizabeth and the monster belong to and structure their lives in terms of Dr. Frankenstein, leading to overall destruction and, ultimately demonstrating the dangerous properties of patriarchy, which Dr. Frankenstein…

Read >>