Hurricane Katrina Essays

Immigration from New Orleans After Hurricane Katrina

The effects of Hurricane Katrina that swept through the New Orleans State in August 2005 were devastating. Statistics show that more than 1. 5 million people were displaced by the hurricane (Sandhyarani, 2010). In addition more than 1,800 people lost their lives. The property damage caused by the hurricane was estimated to be more than US$96 million dollars. After the hurricane, many people opted to migrate from New Orleans due to several factors. There are five main push and pull…

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Hurricane Katrina Was a Man Made and Natural Disaster

The hurricane, of course, was a natural disaster. The after effects like the levees breaching, people starving and dieing in the streets, how the government handle the situation were all man made. The reason being a man made were , The man-made part of the disaster is that the government knew the levees wouldn’t hold up in a Category 3 hurricane, and they didn’t shore them up anyway. What was also man-made was the fact that the government told people…

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New Orleans Before and After Hurricane Katrina

The year 2005 Hurricane Katrina season was one of the fiercest in the United States. Hurricane Katrina formed over the Bahamas on 23 rd August and crossed over to the Southern Florida as a moderate hurricane resulting in deaths and floods. Later, the storm spread rapidly in Mexico Gulf and weakened before making a second landfall on 29th August. Severe destruction was caused most of which took place in New Orleans, Louisiana. In this region, floods resulted from the failure…

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Hurricane Katrina

When an electrical power outage occurs from a storm, we are instructed to have flashlights, battery operated radios, a generator, survival gear, food, etc. But what happens when the power outage is long-term? What happens when the generator runs out of fuel and we can’t get more fuel? What happens when the batteries run down? For those who did not endure Hurricane Katrina, the consequences of loss of power combined with catastrophic flooding cannot even be imagined. The event of…

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Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana

Late Monday morning on August 29, 2005 a little more than 4 hours after Katrina slammed into New Orleans, and just hours after arriving in Baton Rouge, FEMA director and Bush the Younger’s childhood friend Michael Brown conducted a video conference briefing with the President who sat and listened quietly in Crawford Texas. Brown emphatically relayed to Bush, “This is, to put it mildly, the big one, I think. ” Then Brown voiced his fear that “the government might not…

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