Hester Prynne Essays

Dialectical Journal

 “But she named the infant ‘Pearl,’ as being of great price- purchased with all she had- her mother’s only pleasure.” Ah, but let her cover the mark as she will, the pang of it will be always in her heart. ~Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, Chapter II “The Market-Place” “the scarlet letter had the effect of the cross on a nun’s bosom. It imparted to the wearer a kind of sacredness which enabled her to walk securely amid all peril.”…

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The Scarlet Letter Revisited_ a Study of John Updike’s S the Scarlet Letter Revisited

In an interview 1 with Prof. Sukhbir Singh (Osmania University, Hyderabad) John Updike explained what he called his “Hawthorne novels”. Updike’s three later novels – A Month of Sundays (1975), Roger’s Version (1986) and S (1988) – comprise his “Hawthorne novels”. Each of these novels displays amazing intertextual resonance with Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, and are thus known as “The Scarlet Letter Trilogy” of John Updike. Robert M. Luscher2 observes that John Updike’s A Month of Sundays (1975), Roger’s Version(1986)…

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Dramatization of Isolation in Nathaniel Hawthorne’s `the Scarlet Letter’

Nathaniel Hawthorne in The Scarlet Letter emphasizes the theme of isolation throughout the whole novel. Using a variety of literary techniques and descriptions of emotions and nature, Hawthorne is able to fully depict the inner feelings of hurt suffered by the central characters as a result of severe loneliness and seclusion. The torturous of isolation, are experienced by the key figures, Hester Prynne, Arthur Dimmesdale, and Roger Chillingworth, each due to different situations and to various degrees. These characters undergo…

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Dimmesdale_ the Scarlet Letter

Richard Perle, a political advisor of the 1940s, once said, “Sometimes the things we… do seem objectionable in the eyes of others” (“Brainy Quote” 7). This is true of people and situations we encounter in our everyday lives, and all of us are most likely deemed objectionable more frequently than we realize. Our behaviors can appear undesirable, offensive, or scornful to others, while we may not conceive it ourselves. This is certainly true of the way readers perceive Dimmesdale’s actions…

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