Henrik Ibsen Essays

Henrik Ibsen’s Play a Doll’s House

Henrik Ibsen’s play A Doll’s House is about “domestic politics” (Hurwitt, 2004, p. D-2).  Ibsen created a seemingly perfect atmosphere, enough to make one believe that marital bliss exists in such a setting.  As Hurwitt (2004) narrates, “the whole household contributes to the impression of marital bliss” (p. D-2). However, as the play progressed, it slowly becomes obvious that Ibsen wanted to show more than the problems of a married couple.  He evidently wanted to paint a socially significant picture….

Read >>

Far from Feminism_ a Doll’s House

First performed in Denmark of 1879, “A Doll’s House” by Henrik Ibsen shocked Europe with its controversially courageous ideas. Although the play undeniably paints a sympathetic salutation to the plight of women during the 18th and 19th century, Ibsen repudiated the piece as being of solely feministic construct, declaring it a humanistic piece. In fact, when he was being honored by the Norwegian Society for Women’s Rights, Ibsen himself stressed that his general intent as a writer was not to…

Read >>

_death of a Salesman_ by Miller and _a Doll’s House_ by Ibsen

“Death of a Salesman” and “A Doll’s House” are two plays that were written in different centuries. In these plays, among other things, is presented the place that women hold in the family, as well as in the society. Although in many aspects, the two protagonists of the plays, Linda and Nora respectively, appear to have things in common, at the same time they are very different, since Nora seems to be more modern and liberal than Linda, which is…

Read >>

Foil Characters in _a Doll’s House_

Henrik Ibsen creates characters in A Doll’s House who change throughout the play. Ibsen’s use of foil characters helps the reader understand each individual character better. Some of the characters in the play are perceived as opposites but in fact share several similarities. Krogstad and Torvald, Christine and Nora, and Krogstad/Christine’s relationship and Torvald/Nora’s relationship are all foils to each other. Foil characters are mirror images of each other; they have similarities as well as differences. Nils Krogstad and Torvald…

Read >>

Comparison of Nora (a Doll’s House) and Mrs.alving (ghosts)

Nora and Mrs. Alving are two main characters in Ibsen’s plays. They are similar in some ways, but obviously they are both uniquely diverse. They play many of the same roles in their plays, and are probably the most similar two characters between “Ghosts” and “A Doll’s House.” Nora is a unique character, a kind not usually seen in most plays. She swings her mood often; she is either very happy or very depressed, comfortable or desperate, wise or naíve….

Read >>

A Double Standard in _a Doll’s House_

In today’s society, all are taught the social structure that is meant to be followed and not changed; yet, are also taught to stand up for something if enough belief is put into it- a double standard by most accounts. Such standards exist in the play A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen. Set in the time where women’s equality was a joke and with an ending too shocking for the German public, this play brought into light the “two kinds…

Read >>

The Classics, Antigone and a Doll’s House

To understand the relationships and the differences between two stories, one must analyze the story from beginning to end, noting which direction each story heading from the beginning. The plot must be closely looked upon as well as the actors and their actions. Antigone and A doll’s house are very similar stories as they both tragic stories of betrayal and mind games. In Antigone, King Creon makes a statewide decree stating that Polynices, the traitor is not to receive a…

Read >>

A Dolls House, Drama Analysis, Realism and Naturalism

Nora Helmer frolics about in the first act, behaves desperately in the second, and gains a stark sense of reality during the finale of Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House. Ibsen was one of a few pioneers of the new theatrical movement of realism, and accordingly he is often called the father of modern drama. The character of Nora lives in a dream world, a childlike fantasy, where everything is perfect, and everything makes sense, but as the play develops, Nora…

Read >>

Life Changing Decisions

Many women in modern society make life altering decisions on a daily basis. Women today have prestigious and powerful careers unlike in earlier eras. It is more common for women to be full time employees than homemakers. In 1879, when Henrik Ibsen wrote “A Doll’s House”, there was great controversy over the outcome of the play. Nora’s walking out on her husband and children was appalling to many audiences centuries ago. Divorce was unspoken, and a very uncommon occurrence. As…

Read >>

A Doll’s House

Nora will do anything to please her authoritarian husband Torvald. Per Torvald’s instructions, Nora focuses on such womanly disciplines as dancing and taking care of babies, while he sees to all the affairs of money. But when a past financial mistake comes back to haunt Nora and Torvald finds out, the result is an explosion of fury and a shocking revelation that changes the course of the entire family forever (Garland, 1973). Nora Helmer; seems completely happy. She responds affectionately…

Read >>

A Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen

Reading the Doll’s House by Henrik Ibsen makes you want to discern what entirely wives can afford to sacrifice for their families just to be good mothers and perfect wives for their husbands. This is the story of a woman who have succumbed to life’s realities which tell us that sometimes being a mother and a wife does not always make a woman complete but may even rob her of her rights as a real person. The first part of…

Read >>

Symbolism in a Doll’s House

Symbols are used universally to arouse interest to something prosaic and to stimulate the mind. Henrik Ibsen’s play, A Doll’s House is fraught with symbols that represent abstract ideas and concepts. These symbols successfully illustrate the inner conflicts that are going on between the characters. A few of the symbols are the macaroons, the Tarantella dance, and the Christmas tree. Nora lies about the macaroons twice, the first time to Torvald and the second time to Dr. Rank. Nora resorts…

Read >>

Hedda Gabler

In today’s society we have the privilege of doing as much as we can in order to succeed in life or provide for one self. Hedda Gabler sadly did not have this privilege and neither did any other women throughout the 1800s. The roles for gender, both man and women were set in stone. The man was meant to provide stability and the woman to provide children and preform other household chores. All of Hedda’s life the most she could…

Read >>

Arthur Miller’s Death of a Salesman (cited)

Willy and Nora: Tragic Heroes or Home-wreckers? No one has a perfect life. Despite what Aaron Spelling and his friends in the media might project to society today, no one’s life is perfect. Everyone has conflicts that they must face sooner or later. The ways in which people deal with these conflicts can be just as varied as the people themselves. Some procrastinate and ignore their problems as long as they can, while others attack problems to get them out…

Read >>

Supporting Notes

The practitioner we were most inspired by was Katie Mitchell. The crucial idea behind Katie Mitchell is that of Stanislavsky, naturalistic but with a contemporary twist. We chose to explore an extract from Hedda Gabler by Henrik Ibsen. Being, a naturalistic play, we thought that by using Katie Mitchell as our practitioner, we would be able to put a slight twist onto the dated play, and gain more knowledge of the characters. This involved us researching the era of the…

Read >>