Hard Times Essays

Hard Times by Charles Dickens

Hard Times by Charles Dickens juxtaposes fact with fancy and also describes the effects of industrialization on the contemporary human being. An important statement comes from Mr. Gradgrind about the importance of facts He says; Now, what I want is Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life. Plant nothing else, and root out everything else. You can only form the mind of reasoning animals upon Facts: nothing else will ever be of…

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Fancy Versus Fact_ a Study of Two of Dicken’s Characters

Charles Dicken’s novel Hard Times is a commentary on the shortcomings of the Mid-Nineteenth Century England’s Industrialization Era, which favored the development of human beings into machines, without having any emotions or imagination. The characters in this novel have allegorical shades and represent two different ‘types’ of people; two different kinds of products of the industrial age. For instance, Thomas Gradgrind is the main character of the novel and represents ‘facts’. In contrast, Cecilia Jupe aka Sissy’s character stands for…

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Hard Times

Hard Times opens with a look at a Utilitarian educational system.  The readers are introduced to a method of teaching that is centered only on facts and nothing else: no imagination, and “unnecessary” information (Hard Times…..2006). Schoolmaster Thomas Gradgrind fully supports the Utilitarian system, and has brought up his children Tom and Louisa ( and their siblings) in this way. Mr. Gradgrind’s longtime pal Josiah Bounderby – a factory owner – is also an enthusiast of Utilitarianism (Hard Times…..2006). Louisa…

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Dickens’ Hard Times_ His Penchant for Romantic Principles

Hard Times is a rare example of fiction spun out of very prosaic materials. Yet it possesses certain romantic characteristics of brooding tenderness and deep sympathy for the neglected and the underprivileged which became hall mark of Charles Dickens’ novels. It also displays a grieving melancholy, a mournful reflectiveness and a quantity of self-indulgent sentimentality. The American scholar A. O. Lovejoy argues that “the word ‘romantic’ has come to mean so many things that, by itself, it means nothing at…

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Hard Times and Utilitarianism

“NOW, what I want is, Facts”, and so starts Charles Dickens novel Hard Times which first appeared as a serial publication in 1854. Dickens regularly took inspiration from the prevailing conditions as topics of his writings and proceeds to make social commentaries through his brand of creative fiction. Examples of these are Oliver Twist (Dickens, 1837) and Bleak House (Dickens, 1952). Hard Times was similarly inspired. The novel is mainly a critic of Utilitarianism, the dominant philosophy at the time…

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