Epic Poetry Essays

The Involvement of the Gods in Gilgamesh, Metamorphoses, Iliad, and Odyssey

Gilgamesh, Metamorphoses, Iliad, and Odyssey are four ancient mythology literatures that were valued as almost sacred texts by the civilizations that owned them. Gilgamesh is a Mesopotamian ancient text about the local Babylonian king Gilgamesh who reigned in 2700 B.C. The story (or legend) was written initially in the Sumerian language on stone tablets; nevertheless, this story has been reproduced beyond Mesopotamia and hence had versions of the following languages also: Akkadian, Hurrian, and Hittite. In Gilgamesh could be found…

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Epic and Modern Heroes

Epic and modern heroes have many similarities and differences. Their personalities, characteristics, and physical abilities vary. These similarities and differences make heroes unique and memorable for years to come. Epic heroes have a lot of personality. Most people would call them braggarts because they always boast about their adventures, treasures, or battles. Now, heroes are more like ordinary people. A firefighter is a modern day hero and could reside in the home next to you. Modern heroes are not out…

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An Analysis of Religious Influences in the Poetry

During an era in literature when propriety and sensitivities were valuable elements considered both by writer and audience, and spirituality was defined by a specific, almost stringent, set of rules, the arrival of young poet Algernon Charles Swinburne produced a reaction most were ill-prepared to give. For compared to his illustrious contemporaries, Swinburne subscribed to a style and ideology meant to negate all aspects of convention and expand, albeit unwillingly, tolerance for taboo concepts and words. Defiance and aggression, as…

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Love Is Pain

“Then almighty Juno, pitying her long agony and painful dying, sent Iris down from heaven to release her struggling soul from the prison of her flesh.” – The Aeneid, Book 4, line 693             In Book four of the Aeneid, the selection narrates the tragic story between the protagonist of the story, Aeneas and Dido, the queen of Carthage. Although Aeneas and Dido’s relationship only spans a small chapter in the entirety of the Aeneid, it still represent striking themes…

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Euripides Paper

Of the plays that survived the Hellenistic Era of Greece, few survive out of the thousands that were written in celebration of the Festival Of Dionysus. This festival was in honor of the great god of wine, a relatively new Olympian borne of Zeus and a mortal woman, Semele (Rachel Gross, Dale Grote, 1997). He was celebrated as not only the god of wine but also of nature, fertility and later, the stage.             The Bacchae by Euripides is the…

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Epic Stories

Stories are important to us because they give information about the cultures and societies they come from. People would tell stories just to keep the memory of things alive. Oral story telling allows us to have such stories as Beowulf. Stories are an art because they contain so many elements. If we did not have stories today then we would have no lessons or entertainment. Stories often have a moral and they teach us valuable lessons. I prefer fairytale stories….

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Study Guide for the Epic of Gilgamesh

Questions: “Prologue” and “The Battle With Humbaba” 1. What hints does the Prologue give about Gilgamesh’s quest? Gilgamesh will see mysteries, gain a knowledge of the world’s secrets, and go on a long tiring journey. 2. Why does the goddess Aruru create Enkidu? To curb his arrogance, to contend with the king and “absorb some of his energies 3. What is Gilgamesh predicting when he says that immolation and sacrifice are not yet for him? Gilgamesh is predicting he will…

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Alexander Pope’s the Rape of the Lock

The Rape of the Lock begins with a passage outlining the subject of the poem and invoking the aid of the muse. Then the sun (“Sol”) appears to initiate the leisurely morning routines of a wealthy household. Lapdogs shake themselves awake, bells begin to ring, and although it is already noon, Belinda still sleeps. She has been dreaming, and we learn that “her guardian Sylph,” Ariel, has sent the dream. The dream is of a handsome youth who tells her…

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John Milton’s Paradise Lost as an Epic Poetry

The epic poem has been regarded ion all ages and countries as the highest form of poetry and there are great epics in almost in all the literatures in the world. As Dr. Johnson has put it, “By the general consent of critics, the first praise of genius is due to the writer of an epic poem, as it requires an assemblage of all the powers which are singly sufficient for other compositions… Epic poetry undertakes to teach the most…

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Gita Jayanti Speech

“You must be the change you wish to see in the world”, said by one of the most memorable freedom fighters known to man, Mahatma Gandhi. These words Gandhi Ji said goes with the Bhagavad Gita very well. The Bhagavad teaches why we are here, what real purpose of this birth is, what type of problems we will face and how to face them. By taking in what the Bhagavad Gita has to offer us we are making a change…

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The Epic of Gilgamesh Summary

Gilgamesh is the Priest-King of the city of Uruk. He is a tyrannical king who works his people to death and takes what he wants from them. He kills the young men at will and uses the women as he pleases. The people of Uruk cry out to the gods for help so that they can have peace. The gods hear them and instruct Anu, the goddess of creation, to make a twin for Gilgamesh, someone who is strong enough…

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The Themes of Journey and Exile in Ramayana and Gilgamesh

A hero is originally seen as a hybrid of a god and a mortal, this myth is being seen in classical literature and beliefs (Hamilton, 14).  Since then, the definition of a hero has progressed to an  individual who displays extraordinary courage and self-sacrifice in a time of adversity.  The modern context of a hero is an ordinary individual able to overcome odds and  surreal circumstances piled against him or her, and such heroism is backed by numerous qualities that…

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Paradise Lost and Rape of the Lock

Paradise Lost and Rape of the Lock When we think of an epic poem, we rapidly turn our minds to a world of adventures and deeds of heroic or legendary figures. Amongst the greatest epic poems stands John Milton’s Paradise Lost, a traditional epic based on the biblical story of the “fall of mankind”. There also exists a form of satire of the classical epic poem that adapts the elevated heroic style to a trivial subject; this is called a…

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The Nobility of Two Great Men

Both the Norse saga of Sigurd and the British saga of King Arthur involve the narratives of two Kings, each mistaken in their youth for being of a lesser stature than their true destiny and character merit. Each story show the transformation from youth to maturity and charts the pathway from humble beginnings to heroic legend. While the thrust of each of the myths is, indeed, heroic, the heroes of these epic myths are not flawless beings; rather, each of…

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The Epic of Gilgamesh

The Epic of Gilgamesh is an adventurous tale of the mighty King Gilgamesh that is so enthralled in making his name written in the stones of history forever. In his many challenges against this goal of his from meaningless slaughter of an appointed guardian to quarrels with the gods, he loses his loving brother, who was seemingly his other half. With the endless amount of grief the king is almost consumed in, his actions become selfish and fearful of death,…

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