Emily Dickinson Essays

Refer to Poem 327 _before I Got My Eye Put Out_

Dickinson is able to so effectively present the importance of sight because in 1864, she spent seven months in Boston undergoing eye treatment. In Poem 327, she appears to be reflecting on this experience, as well as exploring further possibilities, hence the use of the conditional tense. This is undoubtedly a poem of praise for vision, yet this is balanced by the solitary nature of the poem which creates a sense of pathos. Whilst traditionally women’s poetry was considered to…

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Analyzations of Emily Dickinson’s Poems

Emily Dickinson wrote multiple poems describing objects without ever saying the object’s names. A few examples would be her poems “Leaden Sieves,” “A Narrow Fellow in the Grass,” and “Route of Evanescence.” These poems are similar to a riddle. In order to determine what her poem is about one must analyze the poems to identify what the object is by observing how appropriate the description is and how effective the language is in conveying the essence of the object. The…

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We Grow Accustomed to the Dark Analysis

In the poem We Grow Accustomed to the Dark, by Emily Dickinson, a loss is described in detail using a metaphor of darkness and light. Dickinson uses metaphors, strong imagery, and the way the poem is written in order to describe the loss of a loved one in her life. The poem is written in a first person, and Dickinson uses the words “we” in the first line and the title in order to show that the poem is meant…

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Emily Dickinson Vs. Robert Frost

Darkness is usually associated with fear or the unknown. As children, we are afraid of the unknown under our bed that darkness brings, which, in turn, makes our imaginations run wild, creating monsters, ghosts, and of course, the occasional boogeyman. Even as adults, we still have an antipathy to drive at night or go walking alone in the darkness. So it only makes sense that darkness is used in all forms of art to symbolize some kind of fear, unknown…

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Bad Student

With the turn of the century, the American young republic entered upon an era of (1) expansion and development which can be described only as marvelous. The rapid progress in the settlement of the West, the influx of foreign immigration, the growth of the larger cities, extension of (2) transportation systems by construction of canals and government roads, application of the new inventions employing the power of steam in river navigation and on railroads, — these features (3) of American…

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_i Had Been Hungry All the Years_ by Emily Dickinson

The poem “I had been hungry all the years” by Emily Dickinson explores the persona’s change of attitude towards food. This poem can be taken literally or metaphorically and I have chosen to understand it literally. From the beginning of the poem, the persona informs us that she (assuming the persona is a girl) has not eaten fully for quite a while: “all the years”. However, now it is time for her to eat – at noon. She takes a…

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The Soul Selects Her Own Society

Emily Dickinson wrote “The Soul selects her own Society” in 1862. It is a ballad with three stanzas of four lines each, or three quatrains. Dickinson uses slant rhyme, with each stanza rhyming ABAB. The theme of The Soul selects her own Society is that individuals in society often live in seclusion, only maintaining communication with a select few and how their decisions are generally incontrovertible. Throughout the poem, Dickinson uses an extended metaphor, stating that the soul physically “shuts…

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Emily Dickinson

American poet, Emily Dickinson, is a great example of the transition from the wordy Romantic style of writing to literary transcendentalism. Dickinson’s elliptical style and compact phrases are heavily exemplified in her poem 1577(1545), “The Bible is an antique Volume. ” This piece is full of satire as the speaker questions society’s blind obedience to Christianity and ultimately suggests the embracing of a new religion. The speaker gracefully degrades the Bible’s right as the solitary means to interpret humanity and…

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_death_ Comparison

Editors play influential roles in literature. They can easily alter the overall atmosphere of literature or change the message behind it. Different versions of the poem “I heard a Fly buzz…” by Emily Dickinson demonstrate different caesura, capitalization and word usage. The 1955 edition by Thomas H. Johnson and the original version by Emily Dickinson portray almost identical ideas and emphasis through limited alteration of caesura and word capitalization in relation to death as somewhat unimportant event. Caesura is one…

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Use of Literary Devices in Emily Dickinson Poems

In everyday life, there is a constant struggle to create a sense of self within the mind of every person in this world. There is always a conflict present between the importance of self and the influence that others pose on this sense. When this sense is reached in life, there is still constant influence from others to alter this frame of mind. In many works of literature, this struggle can be seen within the characters of the story. A…

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The Poet Who Watched the World Through Her Window

Emily Dickinson was born on December 10, 1830, in Amherst, Massachusetts. She was the oldest daughter of Edward Dickinson, a successful lawyer, member of Congress, and for many years treasurer of Amherst College, and of Emily Norcross Dickinson, a timid woman. Lavinia, Dickinson’s sister, described Emily as “perfectly well & contented—She is a very good child & but little trouble.” (Sewall 324) She was graduated from Amherst Academy in 1847, which was founded by her grandfather, Samuel Dickinson (Sewall, 337,…

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The Bustle in a House

Emily Dickinson wrote The Bustle in a House in 1866. It is a ballad with two stanzas of four lines each, or two quatrains. There is no set rhyme scheme, because each of the lines is enjambled. The meter of the poem is trimeter, with every third line of each stanza being tetrameter. The theme of The Bustle In the House is about how losing a loved one, while it is depressing in many ways, must not affect how we…

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Poetic Reflections on Mortality and Ephemerality

Have you ever hypothetically pondered the details of your own fatality? Everyone covets a bit of certainty that not many realities allow, but mortality -while a glum concept- is a definite fate we will all ultimately encounter in our respective lifetimes. “Nothing is more predictable than death. Each of us will die without any need to take adventuresome risks. ” (Kelly, 1986). This is likely the reason prolific poets Emily Dickinson and Robert Frost have created quite similar themed poems…

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_i’m Nobody! Who Are You__ by Emily Dickinson

Never judge a book by its cover. Appearances can greatly deviate from what is hidden on the inside. “Richard Cory” by Edwin Arlington Robinson, “We wear the mask” by Paul Laurence Dunbar, and “I’m nobody! Who are you?” by Emily Dickinson each give examples of appearances in contrast to reality. Robinson’s “Richard Cory” is essentially about a man who is set upon a golden pedestal by others and due to his suppressed sadness, kills himself. “We wear the mask” by…

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Was Emily Dickinson Leading an Isolated Life_

Emily Dickinson was acclaimed as one of the greatest poets of the nineteenth century. She got popularity only after her death when her sister found her poems and got them printed. In the later part of her life, people began to call her a mythical figure as she became the most isolated person and used to stay most of the time in the confines of her home. But was she really a recluse as was made out to be? I…

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