Colonies Essays

What Was the Mayflower Compact and What Is Its Significance in American History_

The Mayflower Compact had great significance to American history. The compact kept peace for the people of Plymouth and set limits to the pilgrims. The signing was a historic event and was depicted in writings and pictures. The Mayflower Compact was an extremely important part of American history. There were many pictures and writings that depict the signing of the Mayflower Compact and how important it was to the Pilgrims. In the picture by Allyn Cox, the Pilgrims are gathered…

Read >>

Colonies and Colonizers Costums

Although Alexie was a creative writer, his essay uses metaphors in the context of straight forward statements. Only his reference of a fence can be treated so far as a rhetorical statement. This shows how he might still be saying that although he is teaching his fellow people, they are still not open to real education, as he expresses in some of his statements where instead of learning to read and write, some of his students still ought to stay…

Read >>

Unity and Identity in the Colonies

Because of several events that preceded and lead to it, Colonists had developed strong senses of both identity and unity as Americans by the eve of the Revolution. The French and Indian War was one of the initial events that played a pivotal role in establishing unity amongst the colonists. Winning the war was crucial to the colonists because a loss to the French would result in a loss of British superiority. A British victory would enable colonists the opportunity…

Read >>

The Original 13 Colonies

All the original thirteen colonies of England were the American states that are Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New Hampshire, New York, Delaware, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia. However, despite them sharing common problem, they had several differences that were their key hindrances to attaining their sovereignty. Differences among the colonies Mentioned below are among the variations the colonies had; Ethnicity-different ethnic groups lived in the colonies for example in New York where we had; Native…

Read >>

Plymouth and Massachusetts Bay Colonies

The Reformation was the driving force behind English Catholic dissenters, many of which would eventually form the base of groups heading for new lands to find religious freedom. These people would come to be called Puritans and their goal was to purify the Church of England. They wanted to do away with the “offensive” features such as Church hierarchy and traditional rituals of Catholic worship in order to promote a relationship between the individual and his relationship with God. Through…

Read >>

The 13 American English Colonies Research

The 13 colonies have had their similarities and differences but they were not all formed the same. Since the colonies were not formed for all the same reasons, they were diverse and different from each other. Each colony had their own signature product or material which they would be known for. Even though the 13 original American colonies all belonged to England, there was much diversity between them because differences existed in the reasons formed, their bases of economies, and…

Read >>

Differences Between Colonial Regions

Introduction The New England, Middle and Southern colonies were the part of the New World which used to belong to the British. Although the colonies all had good things, all of the regions had things that didnĀ“t help them grow as a region. Some colonies had rocky soil for example. Having a good climate and a good topography is part of agriculture, having materials to work is part of manufacturing. Industry Each of the three regions had different types of…

Read >>

The Political and Economical Differences Between the Spanish and English Colonies

The Spanish and English colonies both moved to North America seeking opportunities. The difference is that the Spaniards sought gold, while the English colonists sought freedom, religiously or otherwise. Therefore, the Spanish settlements in the Southwest and the English colonies in New England had very different approaches to both politics and economic development. The Spaniards had ventured to the United States region of America from their previous Latin America area. They expected to find the same success they did in…

Read >>

New England Colonies

From the outset, the New England colonies were distinctly different from the Chesapeake colonies, even thought they confronted many of the same problems. Critically, the New England colonies were founded as theocracies rather than as conventional civil governments. They formed tight-knit social organizations, largely closed to outsiders, and settled land on the firmly held belief that they were God’s people. The Puritan belief in their possession of divine grace made them feel distinctly superior to the Indians. Believing in their…

Read >>

Growth of English Colonies

History would not be complete without the mention of the great migration waves of people from the Old World to the New World. The 1600’s were witness to a huge wave of emigrants from the Old World Europe to the North American continent (International Information Programs). The wave started with a few hundred English settlers to a virtual deluge of new settlers (International). These new settlers had many and diverse reasons and motivations in seeking a new life in the…

Read >>

The Overall Sense New World

The overall sense prevalent in each of the three readings is that the beginning of the inhabitation of the New World by the colonists was one filled with trepidation and little exploratory overtures. The colonies were on the surface largely inhospitable, and its original inhabitants viewed as savages were viewed with prejudice, wariness, and dread. As the days progressed, however, it became evident that the savages were willing to explore some form of relationship and interaction with the colonists, and…

Read >>