Atticus Finch Essays

Coming of Age in to Kill a Mockingbird

Unveiled Eyes In Maycomb County, Alabama during the Great Depression, Atticus Finch, a lawyer in Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird, explains to Scout Finch, his daughter, that “you never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view – until you climb into his skin and walk around in it” (39). At first, Scout does not understand the meaning of his words, but as she matures through the novel, her eyes are unveiled, and she…

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To Kill a Mockingbird

Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird incorporates historically accurate material into an otherwise fictional story. Drawing upon current events, social conditions, and attitudes prevalent in the United States during the 1930s, the novel’s setting, characters and themes depict a realistic interpretation of life in a southern town during the Depression. This classic novel takes place during the early 1930s. The novel accurately portrays the social system and troubles of the Depression era, where poverty and unemployment affected numerous states, including…

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Should to Kill a Mockingbird Be Banned_

To Kill a Mockingbird has widely been criticized for the themes and language used in the book, but many believe it should still be read. Some want to ban To Kill a Mockingbird because of the racism, but the book actually denounces racism and prejudice. An example of this is when Atticus tells Scout that he hopes he can get his kids through the case without them “catching Maycomb’s usual disease”, implying that Maycomb’s people are overcome with racism. Also,…

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Play Review Example_ to Kill a Mockingbird

For the play critique assignment, I saw To Kill a Mockingbird on October seventh. The play was performed at the Second Space Theatre and was produced by the Good Company Players with The Dramatic Publishing Company. I have read the book which the play was based on, so I was exposed to the story line prior to having seen the play. Based on my knowledge of the text by Harper Lee, I was able to distinguish distinct differences between the…

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Mayella Violet Ewell

Mayella Violet Ewell is Tom Robinson’s 19-and-a-half-year-old accuser and the eldest daughter of Bob Ewell; she has to take care of her siblings (such as Burris Ewell) due to Bob Ewell’s alcoholism. Before the trial, Mayella is noted for growing red geraniums outside her otherwise dirty home. Due to her family’s living situation, Mayella has no opportunity for human contact or love, and she eventually gets so desperate that she attempts to seduce a black man, Tom Robinson. Her father…

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