Document Imaging and the Role of Health Information Management Essay

An automated record system will ultimately replace paper-based record to provide timely access to health information for health surveillance, resource planning, and health care delivery (e. g. , statistical reports can easily be generated to display health care trends, and so on) (Green & Bowie, 2004). According to Green & Bowie (2004), there are three types of automated record systems, which include: Electronic Health Record (EHR) or computer based patient record (CPR); Electronic Medical Record (EMR); and Optical Disk Imaging or Document Imaging.

The high capacity physical media for storage of medical information, the increasing CPU power for processing complex images, and the advancement in the imaging and workflow technology has underpinned the growth of document systems (Armoni, 2000). Optical Disk Imaging or document imaging which provides an alternative to the traditional microfilm or remote storage systems because records are converted to an electronic image and saved on a storage media; optical disk imaging uses laser technology to create the image (Green & Bowie, 2004).

Based on Green and Bowie (2004), a scanner is used to capture paper record images onto the storage media allowing for rapid automated retrieval of records. American Management System (AMS) architects an enterprise-wide workflow and imaging solution in support of health information management (HIM), financial services (PFS), and human resources processes (Armoni, 2000).

Based on Armoni (2000), the AMS solution has eliminated the paper problem, saved record storage spaces, enhanced the productivity, and reduced labor cost. Most profound is the impact of the HIM management. Many headaches of the paper-based system have been eliminated as one physician user of the system commented, ‘…hours-long delays getting the old chart, lost medical record, charts lost, the need to store records off-campus, etc… no longer occur with electronic medical records’ (qtd. n Armoni, 2000).

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As Armoni stated (2000), physicians are able to make better medical decisions with the system because they can access the patient’s records efficiently and timely from anywhere and at any time; the availability of the files for more than one person is a great advantage with the system; more importantly, the system is able to capture information more accurately, thus reducing the unnecessary errors while increasing the efficiency.

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